Wednesday, September 28, 2016

This Map Shows the Severity of India’s Pollution Problem


This Map Shows the Severity of India’s Pollution Problem


The Wall Street Journal posted an interactive map and article that examined the air quality and pollution in India.  The article states that, “92% of the world’s population live in places where air quality is worse than the WHO’s recommended limits.”

Several Indian cities make the list for the top polluted cities in the world. The WHO also says that approximately 3 million people die worldwide from exposure to pollution. In India, this pollution comes from the burning of trash and the use of coal in cooking and factories.


While this is not an article about a brand new product, this does provide important information about the situation in an emerging market. With this information, companies can look at the problems and make efforts to fix them with the implementation of new products. One example of a similar situation are the groups who sell canned air from areas with low pollution to areas with high pollution. But this kind of product does not fix the problem. Think of the traction a group could get if they were to market an alternative to the current methods of burning trash? Instead of trying to combat pollution, it would make a large impact to use this market information and offer a fix at the source.

http://blogs.wsj.com/indiarealtime/2016/09/28/this-map-shows-the-severity-of-indias-pollution-problem/

1 comment:

  1. Very interesting analysis, thanks for sharing! This made me wonder how effective certain countries that fall under these high pollution metrics will be at attracting foreign investors and marketing certain products in the future. For example, marketing products that are conducive to areas that are environmentally friendly may not be possible in countries that have extremely high pollution rates. These investors may not want to invest in countries like India due to a perceived lack of attention and focus towards environmentally-friendly issues, which could spell lost foreign investment in the not-to-distant future.

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